Improving the capability and sustainability of clubs and facilities; and making golf easier for all Australians to access, learn and play.

 

Investing in community golf is not just about golfers, it’s about entire communities having a great local place to go.

The Pitch In campaign raises awareness and interest in our community golf clubs, courses and the events that take place at them.

State and federal governments can pitch in and help local communities through budget funding, existing infrastructure programs and election commitments.

Clubs, courses and driving ranges receiving funding help can upgrade their facilities and improve the amenity of their buildings and the surrounding environment.

Shovel-ready Projects

The Pitch In: Grow Community Golf campaign highlights shovel ready golf facility infrastructure projects around Australia that need funding to fix up dated and damaged golf infrastructure in both metropolitan and regional Australia.  Our golf courses are not just sporting facilities, they are truly social hubs and useful event spaces.  Supporting these projects is really about supporting the communities living around these golf facilities.

Many golf clubs and courses are in acute need of support in 2019 given an increasing number of golf clubs are operating under financial distress and only remain open because of the hard work done by committed volunteers.

Lots of examples of shovel ready golf projects warranting government support are listed here. 

Keep an eye out for more projects that are being added every week!

Take a listen to the Pitch In campaign being discussed on SEN radio Melbourne.

Interview with Gavin Kirkman, AGIC Chair

SEN Radio (Melbourne)

The Pitch In: Grow Community Golf campaign

Golf is gearing up to ensure that our elected representatives are doing their bit to support the game and its facilities at the local level.

Much of the urgent work needs to be carried out in regional areas, but some of Australia’s biggest cities also have courses that need help too.

Golf facilities are more than just places for playing golf. They are community hubs that include a place for weddings, birthdays, funeral wakes, family reunions, small business conferences and charitable events.  The buildings at our community golf courses are invariably not private, but a place for everybody to use and enjoy appropriately. 

Therefore, the people who benefit from investing in the facilities extend well and truly beyond those just using the golf course.

Community golf projects like the ones found at Merbein in the Mallee, Palmerston City in the NT, Robe in SA and Riverside in Tassie – these are great places for Australians to use in so many ways. But they need help.  They need our elected representatives to Pitch In.

Golf’s great places

Golf facilities throughout Australia showcase the timeless value of getting outdoors and enjoying beautiful green space. 

At golf clubhouses we find a real community venue – an open and pleasant place for socialising and functions.  The comfort, friendliness and visual appeal of golf course facilities should be highlighted and celebrated.  

Golf courses are not just sporting facilities, they are social hubs and useful event spaces.  But today they face real challenges. 

Too many of these clubhouse facilities are looking tired and worn out.  It prevents many people from visiting and enjoying a place that otherwise has all the hallmarks of a great community venue.  

Many courses need repairs or improvements to make the game attractive to newcomers.  It can mean upgrades that enable golf courses to use water more efficiently, employ more staff or attract new tourists. 

There are around 1,650 golf facilities across Australia and you will find most of them in regional areas.  But golf courses are not easy and cheap to run or maintain.  

According to Golf Australia, at least 50% of all clubs in Australia are under financial distress.  Many courses only remain open because of the work by committed volunteers.  They need help.

Golf’s good people

Australian golf’s participants and workforce is diverse and skilled.  Golf clubs are found in every corner of the country and they typically have deep roots in their local community. 

Those who play the game are all ages and come from all walks of life.  Golf is a recreational pursuit that brings people together.  Independent research shows it genuinely improves wellbeing. 

Many sports attract strong participation numbers, but none can match golf’s unique popularity with older adults.  It is a family friendly game and clubhouses are where families can regularly come together.

The people employed at community golf courses instruct players, maintain courses and operate sophisticated equipment. They have deep knowledge about turf growing and water management, host community events, serve customers at the bar and repair or sell sporting goods.    

It is often overlooked that the turf experts at community golf clubs also make themselves available to assist cricket, football and other sporting clubs who require turf growing expertise. 

Some of our all-time sporting heroes are golfers – like Peter Thomson and Karrie Webb.  But community golf is full of local heroes and champions.  Some play the game, others simply do terrific things every day to support their club and local community.

Golf and our communities

To achieve our objective, we need our elected representatives all around the country to get behind Australian golf’s grassroots campaign to support the great places and the good people surrounding our game.

If governments ‘pitch in’, we can grow community golf.

Who we are

Pitch In: Grow Community Golf is supported by the Australian Golf Industry Council (AGIC).

Get involved

If you want to hear more about the ongoing campaign to grow the community benefits of Aussie golf, please lend your support and subscribe to our updates below.